Category Archives: Discussion
Join Nextdoor

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Nextdoor is the free and private social network for neighborhoods. On Nextdoor, neighbors create private websites for their neighborhoods where they can ask questions, get to know one another, and exchange local advice and recommendations. If you are a homeowner in Wynfield, Please join NextDoor at this link: https://goo.gl/taZRzt

Thousands of neighborhoods across the country are already using Nextdoor to:

  • Find trustworthy local resources, such as babysitters, plumbers, and dentists
  • Report suspicious activity and local crime
  • Organize neighborhood events, such as garage sales and block parties
  • Get assistance in finding lost pets and missing packages
  • Sell or give away items, like an old kitchen table or bike

Nextdoor’s mission is to use the power of technology to build stronger and safer neighborhoods. The inspiration behind Nextdoor was to give people a social network to connect them to one of the most important communities in their lives – the neighborhood. Nextdoor believes that when neighbors start talking, good things happen.

Nextdoor is headquartered in San Francisco and was founded by a group of entrepreneurs who have a passion for creating meaningful online communities.

Nextdoor is funded by Benchmark, Greylock Partners, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Tiger Global Management, Shasta Ventures, Comcast Ventures, DAG Ventures, Bezos Expeditions, A-Grade Investments, Google Ventures, Allen & Company, and Pinnacle Ventures, as well as other investors and Silicon Valley angels.

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The easiest way to keep up with everything in your neighborhood.

 

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A private environment designed just for you and your neighbors.

 

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Over 81,000 neighborhoods across the U.S. rely on Nextdoor.

 

Nextdoor is the private social network for you, your neighbors and your community. It’s the easiest way for you and your neighbors to talk online and make all of your lives better in the real world. And it’s free.

Thousands of neighborhoods are already using Nextdoor to build happier, safer places to call home.

People are using Nextdoor to:

  • Quickly get the word out about a break-in
  • Organize a Neighborhood Watch Group
  • Track down a trustworthy babysitter
  • Find out who does the best paint job in town
  • Ask for help keeping an eye out for a lost dog
  • Find a new home for an outgrown bike
  • Finally call that nice man down the street by his first name

nextdoor-lifelineNextdoor’s mission is to use the power of technology to build stronger and safer neighborhoods.

Add your mobile phone number to receive urgent alerts from your neighborhood via text message (SMS). Urgent alerts are time-sensitive updates from your neighbors on topics such as:

  • Suspicious activities
  • Missing children
  • Fires, floods or other disasters
  • Local evacuations

If you are a homeowner in Wynfield, Please join NextDoor at this link: https://goo.gl/taZRzt

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HOA Boards: Four Ways to Prevent and Ease Board Burnout

Let’s face it. In many condo and homeowners associations, a handful of people carry the load for the rest of the community. Those heavy lifters can sometimes become burned out. What can you do to prevent burnout? And what can you do to ease the burden when HOA board members are feeling drained? Here are four suggestions.

1) Adopt functioning committees. Create many committees, and ask as many owners as possible to participate in the committee system. “A functioning committee system is probably the best way to handle the care and feeding of your members,” says Bob Tankel, principal at Robert L. Tankel PA in Dunedin, Fla., a law firm that advises associations. “Have committees that entice people to be involved on the notion that people feel like they’re protecting their investment.” Through the use of committees, you take some of the burden off your most taxed members. You also develop a farm team of members who understand how your association operates and may be willing to step up when a board member needs a break.

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How to Successfully Live Under a Homeowners Association

You may own your home, but your HOA calls most of the shots.

If you buy a condominium, townhouse or single-family home in a newer development, you’re likely to become a member of a community association.

About 20 percent of Americans live in a community governed by a condo association, homeowners association or co-op board, according to the Community Associations Institute, which educates volunteer board members and association management professionals. The number of communities covered by associations has grown from about 10,000 in 1970 to more than 333,000 today.

Community associations come with rules that determine everything from the number of pets you can own to what color you can paint your front door. Some include amenities such as pools, clubhouses and golf courses, while others provide services such as road maintenance and streetlights.

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Do Homeowners Associations Go Too Far?

Thinking of putting up pink flamingos in your garden? Or hanging the laundry out to dry?

You might own the house, the garden and the lot, but if you’re one of the nearly 50 million Americans living in communities run by homeowners associations, you may find you don’t have the freedom to do everything you like on your property.

Homeowners associations are nonprofit organizations that manage the common areas in a housing development. They have rules that can be strict, and critics say that enforcement of those rules is increasingly turning neighborhoods into battle zones.

“The level of frustration in associations is escalating and in some cases, going through the roof,” says Evan McKenzie, a political science professor at the University of Illinois who has written a book about homeowners associations, Privatopia: Homeowner Associations and the Rise of Residential Private Government.

“The problem is when they go to ridiculous extremes, when they become neighborhood tyrants.” McKenzie adds.

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